Fertilizing

Tree & Shrub Fertilizing

Deep Root Fertilization

Deep root fertilization is the process of pressure injecting a soluble fertilizer into the soil surrounding the root system of the tree. (In deep root fertilization, a liquid or soluble fertilizer is always preferred over a granular fertilizer, which typically is absorbed by the turf instead of the tree.)

In order to provide your tree the maximum nutrition, our fertilizer is a mixture of both macro and micronutrients, applied under the soil in a 32″ to 36″ grid surrounding the drip line of the tree. This way, any tree roots inside the drip line of the target tree will receive nutrients during the fertilization process.

A Healthy Tree is a Happy Tree

All bark boring insects are able to find and attack stressed and unhealthy trees, since a stressed tree releases a different pheromone or scent than healthy trees do. A beetle is able to pick up on this scent and is drawn to it. The healthier your trees are, the less likely they are to be attacked. Also if a bark-boring beetle does attack a healthy tree, the tree is able to defend itself with pitch tubes. Producing pitch tubes costs the tree energy, so an unhealthy tree is unwilling to deplete its energy fighting off the attack.

Why should you deep root fertilize your valuable signature trees and shrubs?

  • Provides valuable nutrients to your trees which may have been exhausted
  • Increases color and vigor of your trees
  • Increases growth of young or transplanted trees (it is not recommended to fertilize newly planted trees for the first year after planting)
  • Increases winter hardiness and longevity
  • Increases resistance to insects and disease
  • Provides aeration to the soil around the target trees
  • Trees and shrubs surrounding the target trees also receive beneficial nutrients

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Reasons for tree health decline:

  • Competition with other trees and plants
  • Loss of root structure due to hardscape (curbs, sidewalks, driveways, etc.)
  • Construction damage
  • Environmental factors (drought, weather, etc.)
  • Loss of nutrients in the soil due to removal of organic material (leaves, grass clippings, etc.)